Jump to content

Do you watch old Westerns?


lumper
 Share

Recommended Posts

I never liked Westerns as a rule for most of my life.

now that I am a little older over the past 3 or 4 years I have really started to appreciate older films and shows and that led me to several Westerns.

Here where I live on tv we have several from the 1950's and 60's that air daily.

I started watching them and found 3 or 4 I really love.

Laramie, Maverick, Cheyenne, Wanted dead or alive, Tales of Wells Fargo, etc.. 

Dale Robertson as Jim Hardy is one of my favorites, the character is great and has a comedic quality yet a wholesome quality too.

Totally by coincidence while checking out older movies from the big 4, Cary Grant, Humphrey Bogart,  Jimmy Stewart, and Gary Copper, (also Audie Murphy and a handful of character actors like George Kennedy, and a few others that seem to have been in every Western and war movie ever made from 1946 to 1975, once you see them, you seem to see them everywhere.)

Anyway, while checking out these older films that are really great, especially Alfred Hitchcock movies, but that led me to some Westerns and then to some of these shows I mentioned.

I have come to really love these shows, I use the dvr to record them daily and watch them at night, when you are getting ready to play rdr2 online, watching an episode of Tales of Wells Fargo or Maverick really puts ya in the mood, especially the horses.

Does anyone else ever watch the Westerns? 

Some are really great, especially the movies.

 

 

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep i love Clint Eastwood's and John Wayne's, just to name a couple of my favorite actors in westerns.  I can watch The Cowboys over and over,  just did 2 weekends ago actually :) 

This weekend i plan on watching the spaghetti western trilogy with my son, he's getting into the westerns also - Fistful of Dollars, For a Few Dollars More, and The Good, Bad, and Ugly

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

"One eyed Jacks" (1961) Marlon Brando, Carl Malden, Slim Pickins. This movie started out with Stanley Kubrick directing but wound up with Brando directing it, the only movie that Brando ever directed. 

It's a free view on Prime video and Tubi TV but do yourself a favor and find it on YouTube. The Prime version is really a poor print so find the HD versions on YouTube or elsewhere. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Didn't care for westerns until getting older. Mainly have a sci-fi taste for films. 

Family members recommended "Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid" alot. Couldn't watch it after the sun drops keep falling on my head scored played. Eventually will watch the rest of it.

Do enjoy watching TV series of westerns "Gunsmoke" and "Bonanza" time to time only because that was my grandfathers favorite tv show. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sweet, yes, there are literally TONS of westerns, I ove the golden era, 1940 through 1965 the actors like Jimmy Stewart, Audie Murphy, Gregory Peck, and the list goes on and on and on.

Jack Ellam was a character acter who appeared in many many tv shows and movies from the 40's on til his death in the 70's I believe maybe the 80's he and George Kennedy and a host of others were always a familiar face and lent a comedic sense to most of these films and shows, I just love the genre now.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

56 minutes ago, lumper said:

the golden era, 1940 through 1965 the actors like Jimmy Stewart, Audie Murphy, Gregory Peck, and the list goes on and on and on.

Never could get into those like i did with John Wayne and such.  Then on the flip side, i don't like hardly any of his army movies, Bridge on the River Kwai is one of my all time favorites.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to feel the same way then I watched Vertigo, and The man who knew to much, and North by Northwest, and I was 100% hooked on that era, none of those are westersn though, But Shane, was great, and Sgt York although a ww1 picture was still very much that country, western feel to it, anyway after those, I kind of just found JAmes Garner as MAverick or the Sheriff series he did, two movies, both really funny, and then I just started watching more.

I love them now, cant get enough. 

Tales of Wells Fargo and Death Valley days are two of my favorites, Death Valley Days are true stories put to a 30 minute show so you get some history and entertainment.

I too grew up in the 70's and watch Clint Eastwood, he is definitely a favorite, it took a lot longer to appreicate John Wayne.

Watch The man who shot Liberty Valance, it is awesome!

Lee Marvin another great actor, John Wayne, and Jimmy Stewart, very good film.

John Wayne started believe it or not in the 30's, he was in a ton of movies, way too many to name or even count.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, lumper said:

I used to feel the same way then I watched Vertigo, and The man who knew to much, and North by Northwest, and I was 100% hooked on that era, none of those are westersn though, But Shane, was great, and Sgt York although a ww1 picture was still very much that country, western feel to it, anyway after those, I kind of just found JAmes Garner as MAverick or the Sheriff series he did, two movies, both really funny, and then I just started watching more.

I love them now, cant get enough. 

Tales of Wells Fargo and Death Valley days are two of my favorites, Death Valley Days are true stories put to a 30 minute show so you get some history and entertainment.

I too grew up in the 70's and watch Clint Eastwood, he is definitely a favorite, it took a lot longer to appreicate John Wayne.

Watch The man who shot Liberty Valance, it is awesome!

Lee Marvin another great actor, John Wayne, and Jimmy Stewart, very good film.

John Wayne started believe it or not in the 30's, he was in a ton of movies, way too many to name or even count.

My grandpa was a John Wayne fan,  had lots of fun going to stay with them for a weekend or whatever and watching John Wayne films.  He'd watch "the others" at times, but neither one of us liked them as much as John Wayne.  I didn't start watching Clint Eastwood until i was in middle school.  I had to do a report on a book or film and Fistful of Dollars was in the list of movies i could do the report on.  Dad recommended it so we watched it,  been a fan ever since, in fact that made me look for other movies of his and watch them - First one was FireFox (another one my older brother and Dad wanted to watch, we all went to the theater to see it), then that led me to Any Which Way You Can, i recognized Clint on the VHS cover at the local rental place.  Those are still 2 of my favorites :)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, Kormath said:

My grandpa was a John Wayne fan,  had lots of fun going to stay with them for a weekend or whatever and watching John Wayne films.  He'd watch "the others" at times, but neither one of us liked them as much as John Wayne.  I didn't start watching Clint Eastwood until i was in middle school.  I had to do a report on a book or film and Fistful of Dollars was in the list of movies i could do the report on.  Dad recommended it so we watched it,  been a fan ever since, in fact that made me look for other movies of his and watch them - First one was FireFox (another one my older brother and Dad wanted to watch, we all went to the theater to see it), then that led me to Any Which Way You Can, i recognized Clint on the VHS cover at the local rental place.  Those are still 2 of my favorites :)

Thats great man, good memories too.

Clint did many great movies, those 70's Any which way but loose films were great.

Fun fact, you probably already know this, but in case ya dont, they call those films of Clints, the man with no name films or no name series, but more commonly Spaghetti Westerns they call them that because they were filmed in Italy where regulations were much more manageable and less expensive, many big directors and actors of the day Henry Fonda, Glen Ford, for example, usually preferred to film at least in part at Monument valley Utah where all those great tall stone things (for lack of a better word) are, Clints films never had those amazing views and vistas but you really dont mis them either, he had a way about him unlike most that came before him,

You can find Clint in episodes of Maverick, Wanted Dead or Alive, Death Valley days  and Tales from Wells Fargo, at least that I have seen him in, he was very young, some of those were 1959ish so he looks barely 20 in them as a cowboy, and you can still see that quality that he brought to the role of the outlaw very early on in his cameo or early opportunity roles he played.

Edited by lumper
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 6 months later...
  • 5 weeks later...

I grew up with these shows and movies in the 60's-70's. The spaghetti westerns actually caused a bit of controversy at the time, John Wayne even wrote a letter to Clint Eastwood after the release of High Plains Drifter telling him basically "this isn't what a Western should be, those aren't the kind of people this country was founded by" (paraphrasing of course). They were a dark and gritty departure from the "white hat" era, or the grandeur of a John Ford production.
My generation of course, fell in love with the Spaghetti westerns when they came around.  I have a decent collection of them on DVD now, and continue to build it.  Other than the major ones, like the Dollars trilogy, if you lived somewhere other than a big city, you didn't get to see films like Django and the like, so we had to catch them on late night TV, heavily censored. 
By the mid-late 70's the spaghetti western genre began to parody itself, and we got films like "My Name is Nobody"  "Ace High" "Boot Hill", and the Trinity series.  They became less bloody, gritty, and dark, and became fun romps. By the 80's it was all over.  For modern parodies/humor/quirky, check out Rustler's Rhapsody, Three Amigos, and The Ballad of Buster Scruggs.
One of the hallmarks of all the spaghetti westerns were the low budgets.  The most expensive one ever produced (to my knowledge) was The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly, which was paid for by an American studio (United Artists) and was filmed for roughly $1.2 million.  But the low budgets were are large part of their charm.
I am very glad to see the younger generation discovering all these great films and shows.  Be sure to look up John Ford and check out some of his movies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/27/2019 at 6:07 PM, lumper said:

Thats great man, good memories too.

Clint did many great movies, those 70's Any which way but loose films were great.

Fun fact, you probably already know this, but in case ya dont, they call those films of Clints, the man with no name films or no name series, but more commonly Spaghetti Westerns they call them that because they were filmed in Italy where regulations were much more manageable and less expensive, many big directors and actors of the day Henry Fonda, Glen Ford, for example, usually preferred to film at least in part at Monument valley Utah where all those great tall stone things (for lack of a better word) are, Clints films never had those amazing views and vistas but you really dont mis them either, he had a way about him unlike most that came before him,

You can find Clint in episodes of Maverick, Wanted Dead or Alive, Death Valley days  and Tales from Wells Fargo, at least that I have seen him in, he was very young, some of those were 1959ish so he looks barely 20 in them as a cowboy, and you can still see that quality that he brought to the role of the outlaw very early on in his cameo or early opportunity roles he played.

The lack of regulation also resulted in risk for the actors and stunt men. In The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, Eli Wallach was almost killed twice. Spoiler alert if for some reason you haven't seen the movie:

Spoiler

Once when the horse he was on in the scene where his hands are tied behind his back panicked, and ran for over a mile and a half with him unable to do anything (his hands were actually tied), and another scene at the railroad track where he uses the train to break the chains, there were steps on the side of the box cars that would have instantly decapitated him if he had raised his head up.

 

Edited by Faelwolf
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Here's my collection of Western movies that I have purchased so far from the Google Play Store: 

Deadwood: The Movie 

Frank and Jessie

The Kid 

Tombstone 1993

Wyatt Earp 1994  

Wyatt Earp's Revenge 

 

Not a movie but a really good series with 2 seasons called Gunslingers. 

 

Edited by Vendetta
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

LATEST RDR2 NEWS CLIPS

×
×
  • Create New...