Jump to content

Got my girlfriend a kitten...


ragedhunter11
 Share

Recommended Posts

So I got my girl a kitten from one of those shelter deals that run through pet shops. He is a really happy, talkative kitten. I think he is about 7 or so months old... But he is an absolute nightmare. We both are hardly getting sleep. He legit climbs the walls, tries to get on my computer desk, destroyed my computer chair with his nails, and is always grabbing at our hands and feet with his nails and biting. I have never actually owned a kitten before. I expected him to be playful and do standard cat things but he is NUTS! I am fed up with it.

I decided he has to go back and my girlfriend is crushed but she needs sleep too, she works at a hospital. Is this normal kitten behavior? I would like to try getting another one that is slightly younger and calmer (sleeps more) for her but I don't want to risk this happening again.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm guessing your avatar is reflective of this situation? 🤣

I've had cats all my life and, yes, this is normal cat behavior. Sometimes they mellow out with age, sometimes they don't. It can be a crapshoot. Do you happen to know what breed the cat is? If you got him from a store that got him from a shelter, at least one of the two parties should know. Some breeds are more hyperactive than others. Bengals, for example, can be extremely hyperactive.

Scratching is natural for them, since they have claws and all. Sometimes it's simply a matter of playing gone wrong and paying attention to what your cat was doing when the scratching occurs is the way to figure out if it's just play or defensive. Kneading, now (where they push their paws into you and continuously deploy and retract their claws), shouldn't be confused with scratching or clawing because it's a sign of affection they learn from their mothers from when she was still feeding them. Biting is, to some extent, also an affectionate behavior because of how their mother would carry them around as babies. I had a cat whose usual routine was to come to me, bit the absolute sh*t out of my chin, then she would become just about the most loving and affectionate creature on earth.

Step one to solving the furniture scratching problem is to get a scratching post. Keep on the cat about not scratching on furniture and reward them with a treat when they use the scratching post, and they'll usually start to realize that everyone is happier when they use it instead of furniture. Another thing you can do, in addition to the scratching post, is identify the places where your cat scratches and, if the locations are convenient for you, put sticky paper or something like that on said spots because cats hate those kinds of surfaces.

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, ragedhunter11 said:

I would like to try getting another one that is slightly younger and calmer (sleeps more) for her but I don't want to risk this happening again.

Parzival knows.

An older cat might be a better option. Insane is the default setting for kittens. If they are home alone all day long, they sleep. You cant really expect them to sleep 23 hours a day. They got cat stuff to do at night. Try and keep them up and active during the evening. Eventually they learn when bedtime is. 

Declawing clears up the shredded furniture problems but starts forum wars. It's not a behavior problem, its hardwired and it almost looks orgasmic for them. Ours has always been clawless and he still goes nuts on a scratching post. 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm of the mind that declawing is inhumane and cruel and really no different from cutting off a person's fingers. A cat's claws are its main defensive weapon and as much as it can be annoying when my cats set the furniture in their sights, I'd rather not take away their means of fighting back if they're ever attacked by someone or something.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Parzival said:

I'm of the mind that declawing is inhumane and cruel and really no different from cutting off a person's fingers. A cat's claws are its main defensive weapon and as much as it can be annoying when my cats set the furniture in their sights, I'd rather not take away their means of fighting back if they're ever attacked by someone or something.

I don't disagree but you know that claws will be a deal breaker for many people?

Our current cat came thru the shelter already declawed and neutered. Unless a potential owner has the experience, patience and time to deal with living with a cat, you know that cat is going to wind up back on death row or dropped off in some other neighborhood or worse the first time they trash a $2000 love seat. Cats are a-holes and do a-hole things. 

Keeping their nails trimmed helps take some of the pain out of it and helps them from getting stuck on carpets and curtains. 

Our cat lives the life without claws. He has 12x16 screened in porch to chill in and that is his outside. If he ever had to deal with real life, he wouldn't last 10 minutes with the racoons, skunks and coyotes around here. The hawks, owls and garbage buzzards would clean up the scraps. Even without claws, he took down my wife, broke her ankle and knocked her out cold.........and she is his best friend. He protects himself quite well without fingernails and he still has his fingers to knock things off of tables and bookshelves. 

Just sayin. ☺️ 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you are going to go the route of declaw, only adopt an adult cat in a shelter who has already had this done. There is a reason it is being outlawed around the world. It causes long term nerve damage and emotional distress. I worked part time in a pet clinic when I was younger, they remove actual bone with the nail. It would be like removing your nails and the first bend of your finger tip at the joint. If you can't handle nails, try caps. If that isn't an option, get a bunny or something else small and less likely to claw.

You never know what you will get with a kitten. I had raised a litter of three and while they were energetic, they weren't climbing the walls. They had each other to play with. Maybe consider adopting two kittens from the same litter. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, buttlint said:

I don't disagree but you know that claws will be a deal breaker for many people?

Our current cat came thru the shelter already declawed and neutered. Unless a potential owner has the experience, patience and time to deal with living with a cat, you know that cat is going to wind up back on death row or dropped off in some other neighborhood or worse the first time they trash a $2000 love seat. Cats are a-holes and do a-hole things. 

Keeping their nails trimmed helps take some of the pain out of it and helps them from getting stuck on carpets and curtains. 

Our cat lives the life without claws. He has 12x16 screened in porch to chill in and that is his outside. If he ever had to deal with real life, he wouldn't last 10 minutes with the racoons, skunks and coyotes around here. The hawks, owls and garbage buzzards would clean up the scraps. Even without claws, he took down my wife, broke her ankle and knocked her out cold.........and she is his best friend. He protects himself quite well without fingernails and he still has his fingers to knock things off of tables and bookshelves. 

Just sayin. ☺️ 

Trimming their nails isn't the same thing as declawing, though.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From what I know, kittens are a mixed bag. You are less likely to get a hyper, energetic, wall climber if the kitten you adopt comes from a home birthed litter. Ones that are born outside or have been outside previous will instinctively be more wild. You can also consider calmer breeds. It will be more expensive for sure but you will have a much higher chance of getting a kitten that doesn't keep you up all night.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kittens will always have high energy. My friend got one earlier this year and the second he hit the 6 month mark, he was bouncing off the walls. You just have to make sure you have enough time and patience to work with a kitten to train them. It helps to have a second kitten or an adult cat to help with training. They will mimic what other cats do in the house. Maybe consider adopting an adult cat who is great with kittens this time around. Lord knows there are always adults in need of a good home.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ended up getting her a new kitten. This one is a tiny gray fella. She named him Slinger (like gunslinger) and I love the game. He ran around a lot for the first day but now he is calmer and sleeps a lot. Purrs like mad. Not all handsy either. I think he is about 2 and a half months old.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/27/2019 at 7:42 PM, ragedhunter11 said:

Ended up getting her a new kitten. This one is a tiny gray fella. She named him Slinger (like gunslinger) and I love the game. He ran around a lot for the first day but now he is calmer and sleeps a lot. Purrs like mad. Not all handsy either. I think he is about 2 and a half months old.

The game or the name? LOL

Also, give him time. He will start running around like mad. All kittens do this. They have a lot of energy and need to expel it. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

LATEST RDR2 NEWS CLIPS

×
×
  • Create New...